You read that right – A prominent African-American lawmaker believes it was conversations with President Trump, not Obama, that have given him ‘hope’ when it comes to race relations in the United States.

South Carolina Senator Tim Scott said he sat down with the President a year ago to have an “uncomfortable” meeting about racial issues in America. They had trouble communicating each other’s position because as Scott says, they’ve both experienced different things in life.

“Yeah, they’re hard. They’re painful. They’re uncomfortable, to sit in the Oval Office and have a conversation with the President about things that you strongly disagree about,” Scott said in an interview with CNN’s Van Jones. “He didn’t change his perspective. I certainly can’t change my perspective. Mine’s educated by my experience.”

He said that as the discussion came to a close, however, Trump said something that gave Scott hope for a better tomorrow.

“But the way it closed, I thought, gave me reasons to be hopeful,” Scott elaborated.

 

What was it exactly that gave Senator Scott hope for a future improvement in race relations in America?

Trump said that, even after a conversation in which he had not experienced Scott’s personal troubles with race, a conversation in which he couldn’t quite relate to the problems the black community had in America, that he still wanted to find a way to help.

“Tim,” Trump said according to the Republican lawmaker, “I don’t see what you see. What can I do to make things better?”

 

“That was a shocking response,” Scott relayed. “I was surprised after the conversation that his response was, ‘Help me see a better light.'”

It shouldn’t be too much of a surprise. That is, after all, what a great leader would do – try to understand the other side of things.

 

Now contrast that with the previous president, Barack Obama, who rarely tried to see the other side of racial matters in America, and in fact, called everybody who dared oppose him, actual racists.

Obama’s legacy saw racial tensions worsen exponentially during his two terms in office. A legacy that saw a 64-point decline – 64 points! – in how America viewed race relations from the time Obama first stepped into the White House to the time he left.

Who would have thought that with all the pomp and circumstance that Obama had during his time in office, it would be President Trump who delivered the black community a little hope and change?

Read more at the Political Insider