SMITH: “Where are these text messages? How is this possible? The President is weighing in, saying this is a huge story. Obviously the timing of those text messages can possibly tell us a lot. What does it tell you?”

GOWDY: “It tells me, and I’ll say this with a broken heart, that the law enforcement agency that I have tremendous respect for and that I worked with for 16 years had some bad apples in really important positions of trust and responsibility, and their bias overcame their objectivity. I don’t know how much damage they did, it’s really not my job to prove that – that’s Michael Horowitz and Jeff Sessions’ job to find out how much damage these two agents and others did. But I care a lot about the Department of Justice and the F.B.I. and it breaks my heart that we are having to have this conversation about two agents that only wanted to get the president. They didn’t have any answers in clearing him.”

SMITH:” What about the FISA memo? Are we going to see it?”

GOWDY: “I helped draft it. And I would tell my friends at the F.B.I., ‘Everything I got that went into that memo, I got from you. So I don’t know why you need to see my memo. You got really good lawyers working for the Department of Justice —“

SMITH: “But why not release it, congressman?”

GOWDY: “Well, I drafted it for my colleagues. I didn’t draft it for the F.B.I. The F.B.I. can do their own memo. They got more lawyers than we have on the House Intel Committee. I drafted it for my colleagues so they could see some of the documents, and they are all classified which is why I can’t release it to the public without a vote. But for the F.B.I. to say, ‘We want to see your memo when for months and months they haven’t let us see lots of stuff we wanted to see, the memo came from what you gave us, F.B.I. There is nothing new in there other than what you gave us and you showed us. The fact that I took the time to reduce it to a four-page memo, you can do the same thing if you want to and maybe we can exchange both memos.”

SMITH: “Only a few seconds left. The house Intel and oversight committees are severing communications with the D.O.J. And F.B.I.”

GOWDY: “That’s news to me. I didn’t know we were severing communications. I knew it has been a rocky relationship. I didn’t know that.”

SMITH:” What’s the current status between those groups?”

GOWDY: “I think at some point I would like to sit down with the attorney general Rod Rosenstein and Chris WRAY. There are a lot of people who care about the entities you represent. 2016 and 2017 haven’t been good years for the department and F.B.I. So let’s do the oversight. I don’t want to interfere with the investigation. I have no interest in that. I support Bob Mueller, let me say that again for my Democrat friends. But I do want to provide oversight over the world’s premier law enforcement agencies because they desperately need it or these two people wouldn’t have been involved in the Clinton or Russia investigations.”

SMITH: “A lot going on clearly and we appreciate your time in weighing in on all of this. It is a developing story on many fronts. Thank you.”