We thought complaining about fictional collusion was bad when Hillary spent nearly two years doing it after her election loss, but this might take the cake.

A new documentary slated for release nearly one week after his passing shows Senator John McCain warning Americans about President Trump and Russia.

The documentary, titled ‘Active Measures,’ will debut in theaters on Friday and shows McCain joining Hillary Clinton, Yahoo News reporter Michael Isikoff, and others in discussing what happened during the 2016 presidential election.

The concern levels were high over election meddling – not because Clinton’s campaign paid for the Steele dossier to try and take down Trump, or that the Obama administration engaged in numerous FISA abuses, or even that team Hillary rigged the Democrat primary by colluding with the media and capitalizing on superdelegates.

No, the outrage, of course, was directed at Trump and Russia.

“The fact that there was an attack on the fundamental—the absolute fundamental—a free and fair election, should alarm all of us,” McCain said in a clip obtained by the Daily Beast.

 

McCain can also be seen in the film criticizing Russian President Vladimir Putin as “an individual who poses a threat to the world” and “has no moral standards that I’ve been able to detect.”

The Arizona Senator concludes by making an assessment that the Daily Beast report concludes is an attack on President Trump.

“As long as people can do things without penalty, they’re going to continue to do them,” McCain said.

Is that really an attack on Trump, though? Who were the people in office when reports of Russian election meddling first surfaced? Surely, McCain was in the Senate, but it was also under Barack Obama’s watch that they were allowed to get away with these actions ‘without penalty.’

It was Obama’s former National Security Advisor Susan Rice who reportedly issued a ‘stand down’ order to officials who were developing plans to respond to Russian election meddling attempts in 2016.

That wasn’t Donald Trump. And the only reason Democrats turned tail when they realized the Russians were trying to interfere in the election is that they all believed Hillary was going to win regardless.

Top White House officials at the time were perplexed by Rice and the administration’s orders to stay out of it.

“They were convinced that the president and his top aides didn’t get the stakes,” one report read.

 

The paltry response to Russia’s attempts to interfere led one former senior Obama official to declare it as the hardest thing he’s ever had to defend.

“I feel like we sort of choked,” he said.

Now compare and contrast that to what President Trump has done in regards to Russia since he was actually in a position to do something, having been ushered into the White House in January of 2017.

Some of the most stringent sanctions have been placed on Russia’s elite and their businesses since Trump took office. He has refused to lift sanctions on Russia over their invasion of Crimea in 2014. Due to these sanctions, the Russian economy and Russian geo-economic projects have been severely constrained.

Trump has fired missiles on Syrian military sites in opposition to Russian demands and approved the sale of weapons to the Ukraine. His administration expelled 60 Russian diplomats from the U.S. following the poisoning of former KGB agent Sergei Skripal and his daughter.

“He has been tougher on Russia in the first year than Obama was in eight years combined,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders told reporters.

“He has imposed sanctions, he’s taken away properties, he’s rebuilt our military. He has done a number of things to put pressure on Russia and be tough on Russia.”

“There’s never been a president as tough on Russia as I have been,” Trump himself said following his controversial meeting with Putin in Helsinki, something NPR confirmed was much more than hyperbole.

Perhaps had he wanted to actually stop a foreign power from interfering with the United States, McCain should have tried a little harder to smooth things over and work with the new President.

Obama stood down when it came to Russia, as he did with most of his foreign policy. Trump stood up and fought back.

Read more at the Political Insider