Occupy Albany getting a bad reputation?  The Times Union to the rescue…

The headline makes the case:

Actions of a few make woes for Occupy Albany faithful

The article then goes on to discuss more than a ‘few’ problems, including hundreds of arrests, multiple assaults, and a protestor creating a wanted poster of a police officer.  That poster was created by one of Occupy Albany’s most vocal leaders, and included private information which lead to the harassment of the officer’s family.

That’s not a few.  That’s a plurality.

The report:

After an Occupy Albany demonstrator posted a “wanted” poster on the group’s Facebook page in December seeking the home address and telephone number of an Albany police officer who pepper-sprayed protesters, other Occupy activists were quick to condemn the posting while emphasizing that it was done independently and not by the consensus of the movement as a whole.

The post was quickly removed, but the damage was done as Occupy Albany was implicated in a public backlash to the post that many people deemed intrusive and inappropriate.

The incident is an example of a problem faced by not only Occupy Albany, but also by other arms of the anti-corporate movement: How to keep the actions of a few from staining the image of many.

It’s funny that the Times Union makes a case that only a ‘few’ bad eggs are ruining the movement’s reputation, while simultaneously reporting on ‘hundreds’ of incidents.

Let’s answer the question though – Why does the Occupy movement in Albany have a bad reputation?

Maybe it’s the threatening of a police officer’s family.

Maybe it’s the reported assaults, or the hundreds of arrests.

Maybe it’s the protestor using his child as a pepper spray shield.

Perhaps it’s the $30,000 in property damage.

And why does the Occupy movement in general suffer from a bad reputation?

Maybe it’s the 5,877 arrests to date.

Or the other elements of greed, sloth, wrath, etc.

Whatever the reason, it most certainly is not just a few isolated incidents.  But the Times Union finds it necessary to make excuses for those actions.  Much like the movement itself.

The Occupy Albany movement amounts to nothing more than making excuses. Excuses that legitimize a platform of laziness and entitlements, excuses to act in a lawless manner, and excuses for snubbing basic principles of civil discourse.

On a side note, last I checked the running tally of arrests at Tea Party rallies still stands at zero.