A group pushing to create the Stop Common Core ballot line has filed over 62,000 signatures with the state Board of Elections, making it the largest petition operation in New York State history.  In order to create an independent line, state law requires 15,000 signatures on a designating petition, something the Stop Common Core advocates have done more than four times over.

The stack of signatures was posted to the SCCNY website and can seen to your left.

Via SCCNY:

Gubernatorial hopeful Rob Astorino and his fellow members of the GOP statewide slate will be announcing the results of their very successful petition drive to create the independent “Stop Common Core” ballot line for the November general election.

At 9 a.m., the Republicans plan to file more than 62,000 signatures at the state Board of Elections in Albany.

Astorino, his running mate, Chemung County Sheriff Chris Moss; Onondaga County Comptroller Bob Antonacci, the GOP state comptroller candidate; and state attorney general candidate John Cahill will then be making public appearances across the state to discuss the filing.

The Stop Common Core ballot operation was organized by veteran GOP political operative Vince Casale and Astorino’s campaign manager, Michael Lawler.

Casale posted of the group’s intent just over a month ago saying that “the new ballot line will give them the “opportunity to vote for candidates who have expressed their opposition to Common Core and will fight to end these untested and unfair standards put on our children.”

The ballot line grabbed signatures from all 62 counties in New York state and it will qualify in all 27 congressional districts.

The effort is being referred to as an unprecedented grassroots effort involving volunteers from all across New York State, including Democrats, Republicans, independents, teachers, parents and students.  More importantly, it may mobilize new voters who have never been part of the process.  Voters who remain blasé about things like government corruption, but who want their voices heard when it comes to their children.

Common Core opponents constitute a significant number of voters on both sides of the aisle.  In May, we reported that parents who had opted their children out of the testing this past year were having a significant impact on those schools and their federal funding.

EAG News wrote:  “The elites who foisted Common Core unto K-12 schools in 44 states never expected the parent-led pushback they’re getting in New York.”

What remains to be seen is how legislators respond to this debacle.  Will they propose legislation to rein in Common Core standards?  Or will they punish parents or students who insist on opting out of Common Core?