Black and tan.  Going dutch.   Holding down the fort.  Rule of thumb.

All racist.

This according to the Chief Diversity Officer at the U.S. Department of State.

In a column written for State Magazine, John M. Robinson provides a primer of phraseology that most people might not realize is racist.

Via the Daily Caller:

John M. Robinson, the Chief Diversity Officer at the U.S. Department of State, wants America’s diplomats to know that common phrases and idioms like “holding down the fort” are, in fact, deeply racist.

Robinson, who also serves as director of the Department’s Office of Civil Rights, used his “Diversity Notes” feature in the July/August issue of the official “State Magazine” to examine the hateful roots of everyday sayings. In one recent public relations kerfuffle at Nike, Inc., he wrote, the company torpedoed a sneaker called the “Black and Tan.”

“What a wonderful celebratory gesture and appreciation for Irish culture. Not!” wrote Robinson, an adult.

Remember that the next time one of you insensitive dolts heads out to a bar and orders a Black and Tan. Best part of that excerpt are the last two words – an adult.  Not!

Robinson notes that “Black and Tan,” in addition to being an enjoyably robust alcoholic concoction, can refer to the brutal Protestant militiamen who ravaged the Irish countryside in the early 20th century — which is why Irish bartenders always get so upset when you order one.

In an effort to avoid offending those notoriously fragile Irish sensibilities, Nike pulled the shoe from stores.

Robinson would like us all to learn from the sneaker company’s inadvertent racism and really start watching what we say.

Read the rest of his column here… 

And God forbid you ever go dutch on a black and tan in Chicago.