A report from the Empire Center for New York State Policy indicates that lawmakers have spent over $1 million combined for legal fees in a 6-month time frame.  The New York Assembly rang in at $657,629, while the Senate doled out just over $400,000.

Via New York State of Politics:

The various corruption investigations and sexual harassment scandals have been an economic boon for law firms in New York, according to a review of legislative spending by the Empire Center for New York State Policy.

The think tank found state lawmakers have spent more than $1 million in public money for outside legal representation over the last six months, based on the recently released expenditure reports.

The Assembly has paid a total of $657,629 to five different law firms. The largest chunk of money went to Kasowitz, Benson, Torres & Friedma — $345,000.

The state Senate, meanwhile, has $418,574 in legal services performed by Jones Day, most likely stemming from work performed during the redistricting process.

Other outside spending was most likely due to representation for the Moreland Act Commission investigation and representation for the various sexual harassment scandals in the Assembly.

The press release can be read here…

Earlier today, a Wall Street Journal report showed that roughly $300,000 is being spent to defend Cuomo’s anti-corruption Moreland Commission while federal prosecutors investigate whether the panel itself was corrupted.

New York state will pay up to $300,000 in legal fees including $550 per hour for the lead attorney hired to represent an anti-corruption commission during an investigation by federal prosecutors, according to a contract for the counsel.

The firm, Hinckley, Allen & Snyder LLP, will represent the Moreland Commission to Investigate Public Corruption during the U.S. Attorney’s investigation of its operations and shuttering earlier this year, including meetings with federal prosecutors “and any other law enforcement or regulatory body, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation,” the contract states.

Governor Cuomo recently decided to use campaign funds on white collar criminal attorneys to defend he and his aides in the midst of possible witness tampering and obstruction of justice charges.

Corruption is so bad in New York that City & State recently announced a competition for readers to guess who the next indicted politician might be.