During last week’s debate, Hillary Clinton revealed a specific detail about America’s nuclear launch operation procedures.

In trying to make a point about how careless and reckless Donald Trump would be with nuclear codes, Clinton casually mentioned that it takes four minutes for the U.S. to launch a nuclear strike against its enemies.

The comment has proven that Clinton herself cannot be trusted with sensitive nuclear information.

And in case you think it’s just the conservative blogosphere up in arms over her indifference to protecting such information, think again.

Numerous military members are livid that Clinton gave away more “extremely classified” information, and even left-wing echo chambers like CNN are reporting it.

Take a look …

 

Via the Free Beacon:

CNN’s Barbara Starr reported Thursday that the U.S. military is unhappy with Hillary Clinton discussing nuclear weapon launch times during Wednesday night’s presidential debate, calling such information “extremely classified.”

“We went to the military this morning and asked them. A military spokesman told us that they do not discuss operational timelines for launching nuclear weapons,” Starr said. “This is some of the most classified information. I asked Defense Secretary Ash Carter at a press conference earlier today. He declined to answer the question because it involved politics.”

“But here is the bottom line: the U.S. military does not discuss the precise specifics of the time frames of launching nuclear weapons that, by all accounts, is extremely classified,” Starr continued. “And if you know information to be classified and you’re a government official, even if it’s in the open source, even if it’s on the internet, you are not supposed to disclose it.”

Starr mentioned how unhappy the military is about Clinton’s comment.

“The bottom line is the U.S. military [is] not especially thrilled to be discussing in precise detail what it takes to launch nuclear weapons,” Starr said.

Let’s repeat that one phrase:

If you know information to be classified and you’re a government official, even if it’s in the open source, even if it’s on the internet, you are not supposed to disclose it.

You’re not supposed to strip classified markings off of government documents, provide passwords to unauthorized employees, and move sensitive information to a server in your bathroom either, but that never stopped Hillary before.

In discussing the possibility that what was said on national television might be a crime, the CNN reporter asked, “Could somebody be prosecuted for it?”

She then answered her own question saying, “Who knows, that’s, you know — this is one of these constant questions in Washington nowadays.”

What’s the common denominator in why that question is constantly asked in Washington these days? Hillary Clinton.

Cross-posted at the Political Insider