That letter to families of our fallen soldiers?  You didn’t write that.  Somebody else did that for you.

And then signed it with an electric pen.

Jim Host writes:

On August 6, 2011, 30 US service members were killed when a CH-47 Chinook helicopter they were being transported in crashed in Wardak province, Afghanistan. It was the deadliest single loss for U.S. forces in the decade-long war in Afghanistan. 17 members of the elite Navy SEALs were killed in the crash.

Yesterday, Karen and Billy Vaughn, parents of Aaron Carson Vaughn, spoke at the Defending the Defenders forum sponsored by the Tea Party Patriots outside the RNC Convention in Tampa. Karen brought a copy of the form letter they were sent following their son’s death.

It’s a form letter.

(Photo:  Gateway Pundit)

Something a touch more personal would be nice, considering these were members of the Navy SEALs who gave their lives at the direction of the Commander-in-Chief.

Well, at least the signature on those letters was a nice personal touch.

That’s not all.

Karen Vaughn reached out to the parents of the other SEALs killed in that crash. Their letters were all the same.

Form letters – signed by an electric pen.

It must be standard practice, right?  Surely the cold-hearted former President Bush only sent form letters to the families of our fallen soldiers.

From the Washington Times (2008):

For much of the past seven years, President Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney have waged a clandestine operation inside the White House. It has involved thousands of military personnel, private presidential letters and meetings that were kept off their public calendars or sometimes left the news media in the dark.

Their mission: to comfort the families of soldiers who died fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and to lift the spirits of those wounded in the service of their country.

But the size and scope of Mr. Bush’s and Mr. Cheney’s private endeavors to meet with wounded soliders and families of the fallen far exceed anything that has been witnessed publicly, according to interviews with more than a dozen officials familiar with the effort.

“People say, ‘Why would you do that?’” the president said in an Oval Office interview with The Washington Times on Friday. “And the answer is: This is my duty. The president is commander in chief, but the president is often comforter in chief, as well. It is my duty to be – to try to comfort as best as I humanly can a loved one who is in anguish.”

I don’t get it.  For eight straight years, we were told that George W. Bush was eeee-vil, while President Obama was the compassionate savior.

No matter, bottom line is that more American troops were killed in Afghanistan under Bush’s watch than Mr. Nobel Peace Prize.

CNS News:

Although President Obama has only served 39 months in office, 69 percent of the U.S. military fatalities in the more than 10-year-old war in Afghanistan have occurred on his watch.

Through April 30, the Defense Department had reported that 1,844 U.S. military personnel have been killed in and around Afghanistan while deployed in Operation Enduring Freedom, which was launched in October 2001 after al Qaeda terrorists attacked the World Trade Towers and the Pentagon.

According to’s comprehensive database on Afghan war casualties, at least 1,275 of the 1,844 U.S. troops killed in the Afghanistan conflict have been killed since Jan. 20, 2009, when Barack Obama was inaugurated as president.

Wait, what?

Could it be that the media has lied to us?  That the portrayals of these two men have been wrong?