Whether it’s bilking taxpayers out of hundreds of thousands of dollars, funneling money into non-profits so that pet poodles can get spa treatments, trying to rig the New York City mayor’s race, serially harassing women and then covering it up, perpetually sexting one’s junk, or committing extensive and persistent voter fraud, the Empire State has certainly had more than its fair share of political corruption this past year.

But at least one man is determined to turn lemons into lemonade.  College of Saint Rose professor, Bruce Roter, is proposing a Museum of Political Corruption to draw in tourists to the capital of corruption – Albany, New York.  And he’s pretty serious about the idea, too.

Via the Times Union:

A Museum of Political Corruption.

Yes, it sounds like a joke. But Albany resident Bruce Roter insists the campaign he’s launched is as serious as a root canal.

“If Albany is going to be associated with corruption, we might as well cash in on it,” the College of Saint Rose professor said. “Why not embrace it?”

Roter has already started setting up a website for the effort, as well as a Facebook page.

There would of course, be serious matters to discuss according to Roter.  The museum “would offer real lessons on political history and could host lectures on civic issues.”

However, while corruption is high and quite serious in New York state politics, Roter is approaching the project with an incredible sense of humor.  According to the report, the museum will ask visitors for a bribe rather than an admission fee, would serve pork as a main menu item in the cafeteria, and will feature interactive venues in which visitors will be able to wear a wire and trick their friends into admitting a crime.

The reporter adds their own ideas for the museum:

Also, should sexual peccadillos count as corruption? Including them would boost attendance, no doubt.

“Oh, look! Eliot Spitzer‘s black socks!!

“Oooooh. Anthony Weiner‘s cellphone!”

“Check out the hiking boots that Mark Sanford never wore!”

I’m not sure how far this idea would actually go, as it would depend on the viewpoint of the public.  Would they look at this as Albany having a sense of self-deprecating humor, or would it simply draw negative attention to a state that needs little more focus on corruption?

Regardless of what the future brings, it’s a pretty damn funny idea to think about right now…