And along with moving the company, New York will see millions of dollars in economic activity and the potential for over 100 jobs walk across the border to Pennsylvania.  Here we thought Governor Cuomo was serious about that “Open for Business” thing.

Specifically citing hasty passage of the unconstitutional SAFE Act, Kahr Arms has decided to shutter its headquarters located in Rockland County, and set up camp in a new facility in Pennsylvania.

Via the Times Union:

Business has been good for Rockland County-based Kahr Arms, so much so that it plans to expand with a new factory on more than 600 acres.

The trouble, at least for New York state: The gun manufacturer, currently based in Rockland County, is expanding across the border in Pennsylvania, and in the process will be moving its headquarters out of the Empire State. The reason, according to a corporate official, can be found in the swift passage last January of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s SAFE gun control law.

It wasn’t so much that the measure bans certain kinds of guns and magazines, the company said. Instead, it was the suddenness with which the law was passed — less than 24 hours after being released to the public — leaving Kahr’s executives to wonder what kind of unforeseen regulations or restrictions might lie ahead.

“One of our big concerns was, OK, the SAFE Act was passed in the middle of the night. You wake up the next morning and boom, that was it,” said Frank Harris, Kahr’s vice president of sales and marketing. “We just felt like, gee, if they can do this, what can they do next?

Kahr Arms currently achieves up to $100 million in sales, and the new 620 acre facility could add 100 jobs to their current staff.

In order to pass the New York SAFE Act, which substantially erodes a citizens Constitutionally granted Second Amendment right to bear arms, Governor Cuomo had to circumvent his own state Constitution.  That document has an amendment requiring a three-day public review of all laws.  By issuing a “Message of Necessity”, Cuomo was able to pass the law without public scrutiny, with the Senate actually voting on the bill a mere 30 minutes after receiving it.

The process led to State Assemblyman Steve McLaughlin to say that, “Moscow would be proud of our state Legislature and Executive Chamber, but every New Yorker should be outraged.”

Cuomo admitted that allowing a three-day public review would have killed the momentum behind his gun control bill.

“Nothing like that will ever happen without a message of necessity,” he said.

Kahr Arms seems to recognize that issuing a message of necessity to trample on the Second Amendment, means that New York lawmakers could do the same for any constitutional amendment.