Following reports that he had snorted cocaine as a state senator, the New York GOP sent Attorney General Eric Schneiderman a free drug test.

Reports last week indicated that, despite claiming as a candidate that he can offer “a smarter approach to fighting illegal drugs,” Schneiderman was himself being accused of snorting cocaine in the back of a bar.  The accusations didn’t come from his Republican opponent John Cahill, or even supporters of Cahill.  They came from a man who just ran in the Democratic primary for governor of New York, Randy Credico.

Today, the NYGOP sent out this message to Schneiderman:

Attorney General Schneiderman:

As Attorney General, you may be aware that our police and local law enforcement officers are required by law to undergo drug testing. You may also be aware that statewide communities are battling a horrific heroin epidemic. With long-time questions standing regarding your use of recreational drugs and in the wake of accusations by a close former associate that you used recreational drugs while a member of the State Senate, we believe it is critical to New Yorkers to once and for all resolve the mystery surrounding your use of illegal drugs.

Our simple request is that you, as the chief law enforcement officer of the State of New York, abide by the same standard to which we hold the cop on the beat. As such, we are providing this drug testing kit – free of charge – with a request that you submit to a drug test administered by an independent laboratory.

We appreciate your prompt attention.

The New York Observer takes a more serious tone on the matter …

The attorney general is the state’s top law-enforcement official, and Mr. Schneiderman has been airing commercials touting his tough-on-crime credentials. Reports that he snorted coke while serving in the state Senate-from a named source in his own party-deserve a full airing in the campaign’s final days.

Cahill has picked up endorsements from both NewsDay, Crain’s and the New York Observer, and a fairly recent poll shows him gaining on Schneiderman, closing the gap by 11 points in September.