Jason Zimba, who NPR once dubbed “the man behind common core math,” is advising parents to back off of teaching their kids basic lessons because they’re not trained to properly do so.

Zimba made the comments in an education journal, adding that the only thing parents need concern themselves with is that their children have finished the homework.

Via the Daily Caller:

One of the chief creators of the Common Core math standards is warning America’s parents to stop teaching their own children basic math because, he says, public school teachers are well-trained experts who understand rudimentary arithmetic far better.

The directive to leave children submerged in confusion as they try to do homework comes from Jason Zimba, who was part of a trio that originally wrote the Common Core math standards.

“The math instruction on the part of parents should be low. The teacher is there to explain the curriculum,” Zimba told The Hechinger Report, an education journalism website published by Columbia University’s Teachers College.

“The most important rule as a parent is to make sure it gets done,” said Zimba, who believes he himself is too busy to stoop to math assistance. “I may not have time to do an impromptu lesson on math but I can make sure everything is completed.”

The report in it’s entirety tries to convince parents that it’s not their place to help children when they’re struggling with the Common Core standards, even laying blame on helpful parents when they get frustrated.

The entire piece is titled, Back off parents: It’s not your job to teach Common Core math when helping with homework.

It includes sections that tell parents not to try and be math gurus, and warns them against stepping on the toes of the teachers.

In the past, Zimba has lamented that the Common Core standards he helped craft – the same standards that have led parents to complain about government overreach – simply weren’t overreaching enough.

These days, Zimba and his colleagues acknowledge better standards aren’t enough.

“I used to think if you got the assessments right, it would virtually be enough,” he says. “In the No Child Left Behind world, everything follows from the test.”

Now, he says, “I think it’s curriculum.”

Yes, the problem is that we didn’t build a powerful enough bomb. If we built a bigger bomb, then it would be used the correct way.

It isn’t simply the federal overreach – it’s the very real frustration children are feeling when they try to learn math in an unnecessarily complicated way. Zimba and the Common Core creators have taken basic math concepts and turned them into arbitrarily complicated processes.

My own child has suffered through hours of math homework only to be thoroughly relieved when he is taught the proper way to do things, a moment of clarity that reminds him that he isn’t stupid after all.

A staggering 20% of students in New York opted out of Common Core testing this past year, indicating they likely won’t agree with Zimba’s suggestion to stay out of their children’s math homework because they’re not smart enough, or properly trained to help them.