The brother of a victim who was murdered in the San Bernardino terrorist attack penned a tribute to his sibling that included a strong defense of second amendment rights, as well as a statement that we are indeed at war with radical Islamic terrorists.

In short, his statements are what you would have expected from our own leaders, or our own president.

Timothy Sandefur penned the touching yet honest tribute for his brother, Daniel Kaufman, on his personal blog. He described his brother as “a deeply kind and gentle man,” adding that “everything you’ve heard about what a cheerful and gregarious person he was is true.”

Sandefur tackled various elements of the family’s story, thanking people for prayers and explaining some personal aspects of Kaufman’s life before addressing the Second Amendment right to bear arms.

“My family has always believed, and still believes, that all people everywhere have a fundamental right to possess guns for self-defense, against criminals as well as against the government,” he wrote.

“This right is enshrined on an equal footing with other essential rights in our Constitution, and that all elected officials are bound by oath to respect and protect it,” Sandefur added.  “Efforts to disarm law-abiding people, such as are now underway, are counterproductive and wrong. Danny shared our belief on this matter.”

He explained that emotional responses to “do something” about guns just to do something “are just begging for irresponsible lawmaking.”

Sandefur then launched into an effort to explain to people that we are indeed at war with radical Islam.

In the opening few paragraphs, he writes my brother “was killed by Muslim terrorists in San Bernardino on December 2, along with 13 other people.”

He later expands on this in a statement which is best left in Sandefur’s own words, because it is so powerful:

I believe there is no solution to the jihadist threat short of victory against our enemies. When attacked, one has a basic choice: one can curtail one’s own behavior, in hopes that the enemy can be persuaded not to attack again—or one can accept the challenge, and defeat that enemy. The United States has so far largely chosen the former.

For years now, officials of both parties have refused to face the fact that we are targeted by theocratic totalitarian movement, funded and overseen by Saudi Arabia and Iran, among others, which is committed to the destruction of the values essential to civilization. Our current President believes that the war against Islamofascism should be “ended.” But wars are never “ended.” They are either won or lost.

Unless we accept the responsibility of victory, attacks like this—like Fort Hood, like Chattanooga, like Little Rock, like Los Angeles, Boston, Garland, Madrid, London, Bali, New Delhi, Delhi, Delhi again, Paris, Paris again, and so many others, including of course New York City—will only continue. War is horrible. But it is not the worst horror. A life without freedom or law is still worse. Peace, said Churchill, cannot be “preserved by praising its virtues.” Nor by lowering flags to half-staff, reading lists of victims’ names, putting “coexist” bumper stickers on your car, having James Taylor play at your press conferences, etc. That may feel nice, but the future of freedom, peace, and civilization requires more than hugs and hashtags. It demands that we compel the Islamist aggressor, who has warred against us since 1979, to cease making war and accept peace on civilized terms.

Daniel Kaufman’s brother’s tribute (we urge you to read the entire thing) is touching and profound, sad to read, but honest and heartfelt.  It is common sense regarding the Second Amendment and America’s current war with radical Islam, in the midst of a tragic event.

It’s everything we needed to hear.

Post first appeared at the Political Insider