Subtlety isn’t exactly a strong point for unrepentant terrorist and current Occupy Wall Street instructor, Bill Ayers.  Ayers will have his graphic novel adaptation, To Teach: The Journey, in Comics, featured at the Portland Stumptown Comics Festival.  Seriously.
In an interview for AOL’s Comic Alliance, Ayers spells out his intentions over the following year – intentions that only the well-trained eye can interpret as a veiled reference to the Occupy movement.

Via Comics Alliance:

CA: What are you working on this year? 

BA: I’m working over-time this year on occupying this and occupying that, occupying the future and occupying my imagination, occupying everything in and out of sight.

Did you catch that?  Read through it again, and you might just notice the word ‘occupying’ showing up one or two or five times.

And occupy he has.

A few weeks ago, Ayers paid a visit to the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York City and waxed poetic about the end of American capitalism, before ranting about “uniformed military” being allowed to board planes before everyone else.

Ayers also spoke to a group of students at Knox College last Thursday, questioning why he is referred to as a ‘former activist’, and drawing parallels between anti-slavery, universal suffrage movements and Occupy Wall Street movements”.


Last month, some of Ayers’ best friends and most accomplished domestic terrorist partners were in upstate New York for a meeting called, The Weather Underground Meets Occupy Wall Street.  


With this recent spate of activity, it would appear the two movements are merging causes in anticipation of the Occupiers becoming “more radical“.  Their words, not mine.


In the Comics Alliance interview, Ayers continues…

Revolution is still possible, democracy and socialism, possible, but barbarism is possible as well.  I’m trying to live leaning forward, a pessimist of the head but an optimist of the heart.  I find the tools everywhere-humor and art, comics and poetry, protest and spectacle, the quiet, patient intervention and the angry and urgent thrust-but the rhythm of activism remains the same: we open our eyes and look unblinkingly at the world as we find it; we are astonished by the beauty and the suffering all around us; we recognize that right next to the world as such is a world that could be or should be; we dive into the wreckage and swim as hard as we can toward a distant and indistinct shore; we doubt that our efforts make enough difference, and so we rethink, recalibrate, look again, and dive in once more.  If we never doubt we get lost in self-righteousness and political narcissism-been there. If we only doubt we vanish into cynicism and despair.  Awake/Act/Doubt!  Repeat for a lifetime.

When referring to barbarism and ‘repeating for a lifetime’, one has to wonder if Ayers has these particular parts of his activist past in mind:

Ayers took part in a series of bombings in the 1970s that killed three activists.  The intent was much worse however, as the bombings were designed to kill army officers in New Jersey – It accidentally exploded in a New York townhouse.
Lest we forget that in regards to the day he successfully bombed the Pentagon, Ayers said, “Everything was absolutely ideal. … The sky was blue. The birds were singing. And the bastards were finally going to get what was coming to them.”
And of course, there is William’s mantra to “Kill all the rich people. … Bring the revolution home. Kill your parents.”
More famously, in an article that appeared in the New York Times on September 11th, 2001, Ayers was quoted as saying that he did not regret setting bombs and, “I feel we didn’t do enough.”

At the end of the interview, Ayers also announced two new book projects in the works:

Oh, and I’ve got two new books on the way: Palling Around: Talking with the Tea Party, and What If? Releasing the Radical Imagination.

Ayers radical imagination has yet to be unleashed?  Imagine how much worse it can get.