RUSH TRANSCRIPT:
>> Let’s shift gears to politics. Your mom claimed, and was asked in an interview about the election. She said if it weren’t for Comey’s interference, and Russia’s interference, she would likely be president. Her supporters wanted to see more from her, and take personal responsibility for voters’ trust issues and the Democratic Party not having a great ground game in some states and messaging so they could fix the problem moving forward. Has she changed her mind about how to approach this topic to kind of ease her supporters’ worries and maybe facilitate growth for the party in the future?
>> Jedediah, a lot of questions in there. My mother has talked about this herself. He is working on a book now about the election. I had the privilege of campaigning in so many states for her, and I met so many of the remarkable organizers and volunteers and as she said, you know, she is never going to blame her team. She had an amazing team of supporters, of surrogates, of staff. More than a million people volunteered as part of her campaign effort and she is grateful for that, and proud of the swell in this country that is still fighting to protect our health care, fighting to ensure we do stay in the Paris accord and all the things she campaigned so hard for, and for me, I don’t think about my children, with all do respect to my mom, more than my mom, and the world I want them to be able to grow up in, and that’s where I think my responsibility now lies as a mother and as a citizen. What I can do to help build the world that I want them to grow up in? Part of that is common decency. As we were talking about earlier.
[ Applause ]
Part of that is standing up for policy.
>> She has taken some of the blame for it. I have heard her say that, and maybe people can have two thoughts in their head at once. It was the Russians and I made mistakes. She said it.
>> She did.
>> What do they want from her?
>> We’re never going to know.
>> Nobody loves your mother more than you do.
>> We can split credit on that. It’s a tie.
>> I have seen a change in you though. You weren’t very political, I think, of course, growing up, and then on Twitter, lately, you gotten feisty and kind of sassy.
[ Applause ]
You know, you tweet about health care and the environment. I have to ask you, is it covfefe or covfefe? And what does it mean?
>> I think it can mean whatever we each want it to mean, right? Even the dictionary said, you know, we’re going to stay out of it, right? Merriam-webster has gotten a little bit spicier since the election.
>> That’s a good account to follow.
>> It is a good account to follow. I think that we have so many more important issues confronting us today. Even in addition to the rumor withdrawal from the Paris climate accords, another rumor that the Trump Administration is going to take away every woman’s right to have free contraception as part of their employer mandated insurance.
>> You can try, but they are not going to lift it.
>> We need to focus on that, but that is important too. Covfefe, covfefe.
>> Tomato, tomato?
>> Your mother isn’t running anymore. Why are you spicy?
>> She is pissed.
[ Applause ]
>> Just curious.
>> Well, last year, I did hundreds of events and interviews.
>> Yeah.
>> Throughout the campaign. I was grateful to be on “The view” as part of that, and what I’m saying now on social media I was saying, you know, in interviews and on the stage. I was not shy in calling out, well, everyone. About my concerns about — I know you were talking about fake news earlier, and fake news and fake science around vaccinations for example, or my concern we have lost a scientific consensus around climate change.
>> Have we all lost that?
>> No. We are calling out hate speech when I see it and also standing up for common decency. We’re holding two thoughts in our heads and hearts, and we have to be able to say this is unacceptable from a common decency perspective, and this is unacceptable from an American values perspective. Even if the person saying something is someone we otherwise might agree with.
>> You’re not running in political office, but your political tweets give people hope. Is there anything that would change your mind?
[ Applause ]
>> Thank you. I think, you know, as I have said before —
>> You made that.
[ Laughter ]
>> As I have said before, I don’t think being a citizen is something that just happens on Election Day. Registering to vote and showing up to vote is hugely important.
>> We learned that.
>> And also standing up for what we believe. Saying what we believe. Saying what we’re for and against. I’m incredibly encouraged by the more than 13,000 young women who have reached out to Emily’s list saying they want to run for office. For city council. The board, stage legislature. Congress. I hope we will have more women low throwing their hat in the ring, and I look forward to supporting some of those women in the future.
[ Applause ]
>> So everybody calm down. It’s not happening in 2020. But what is happening is that we’re going to come back with more with Chelsea Clinton.

Comments

comments